My Blog

A perfect Sunday Morning

'Parsley in the Woods'
'Parsley in the Woods'


Last Sunday I managed to get out again with Paul Moon. We have abandoned the idea of making it for dawn as the timings are getting a little silly, so it was with a feeling of having had a slight lie in that I met Paul at Millington at 5:30am.

It turns out that we missed the light. As I looked out the window getting up, there was a glow of warm sunlight. By the time I reached Millington is was overcast. So we abandoned 'Plan A' to work Frendal dale and headed back up to the Meadow with the Elder Tree.

I had noticed when out the previous week that the wood behind the Elder tree was starting to get covered with cow parsley and I thought that this would make a wonderful image in the early morning diffuse light.

Composition however was a challenge. We scouted the wood for a while and I noticed many magnificent trees before I settled on the image at the top of the page that I am very pleased with. There is a lovely feel to the transparency, with movement in the cow parsley from a long exposure, soft light in the foreground, brighter light behind. I was particularly pleased with my composition because I worked hard to place the camera very precisely. I also used Provia, an unsusal choice perhaps for the conditions, but I felt from experience I would need the extra dynamic range.

Very pleasing. We moved on to examine the birch trees in the medow, careful not to disturb the grass around the Elder Tree which was starting to flower but was probably a week or two away from being perfect.

This place is even harder, and I hunted for ages to find a composition that worked for me, finally settling on this image:

'Millington Birch Trees'
'Millington Birch Trees'


At this stage we decided to head over and scout out another area that Paul knew about near Bishop Wilton. I had driven through the village a few times but I was not prepared for how magnificent it is. Even at a first glance, this place has enough depth to keep me coming back for many a day. In particular, there is a wonderful fallen tree that Paul had found the week before that must have a thousand or more images in it. Tulips eat your heart out.

I was like a kiddy in a sweet shop, but with great effort I exercised enormous discipline and limited myself to one image. For there was a valley to scout.

'Waves in a tree'
'Waves in a tree'


Velvia has done a fine job here, bringing out the subtle colour in the tree. Thanks for Paul for assisting me (in this image and the next) by holding the quick disk so I could calculate the bellows factor precisely.

The trees surrounding it were also magnificient and I resolved to return next of an evening. We walked down into the valley and its potential only increased. On the other side, we paused to get our breath back at another fallen tree. I noticed that the bark on the side of the tree was cracking and looked rather like the skin of an elephant. I made another image:

'Elephants Skin'
'Elephants Skin'


I was playing with the idea of balancing lines and cracks and this is one of those images that fascinates me. I can play with compositions like this all day.

Finally we scouted out images of the giant daisies and I found a couple of compositions that I knew would also work in the evening light. Having missed last night, rather stupidly watching England, I will have to wait till Sunday evening to develop this area. Yet another perfect morning on the wolds.

Addendum:

Here is the LF scouting image of the daisies:

'Scouting Bishop Wilton'
'Scouting Bishop Wilton'